Why Do Some People Get White Spots On Their Teeth?

Everyone wants a bright, white smile. But not everyone wants teeth that have spotty areas of even whiter patches. However, this is incredibly common. But why do some people get white spots on their teeth? Can you remove them? Are they anything to worry about? Here’s the lowdown from your dentist in Boerne on what these spots are and what to do if you have this condition.

Causes of White Spots

There are many different things that can cause white spots to appear on teeth, and some of the causes can occur in childhood, but the spots still show in your adult smile. Some causes of white spots can include: 

  • Too much fluoride
  • Trauma to teeth
  • Poor dental hygiene
  • Hypoplasia
  • Diet

While many causes of white spots aren’t serious, some can result in additional problems. This is why it’s important to talk to your dentist in Boerne about any changes to your teeth or if these spots bother you. 

A Closer Look

Let’s take a closer look at some of the main reasons behind white spots on teeth. 

Too Much Fluoride

One of the main causes of white spots is something called fluorosis. Fluorosis occurs during childhood when there’s too much exposure to fluoride. Fluoride is beneficial in strengthening tooth enamel and keeping cavities away. But too much of it can cause these little white spots to appear. These white spots can then stick around and continue to show up in adult teeth. 

Hypoplasia

Hypoplasia is another cause of white spots that typically occurs during childhood but can also happen as an adult. This condition weakens tooth enamel and can be brought on by some medications, dental trauma, diabetes, and other illnesses

Demineralization

Demineralization occurs when too much bacteria is left lingering on teeth, allowing it to wear down enamel and not only potentially cause white spots, but also an increased risk of cavities

Diet

Your dentist in Boerne recommends that everyone follow a well-balanced diet of fruits, vegetables, and limited amounts of sugar and acid. Not only will acidic and sugary snacks weaken enamel and increase the risk of decay, but they can also cause white spots to appear on teeth. 

How to Treat White Spots on Teeth

Treating white spots on teeth may depend on what caused them to begin with. Some ways to remove white spots may include forms of cosmetic dentistry such as porcelain veneers or whitening your teeth. You should always start by talking to your dentist about treatment options. 

Some of the best ways to prevent white spots from showing up on your teeth as an adult are to brush and floss your teeth every day, eat a well-balanced diet, and maintain regular dental checkups every six months. 

Can a Dentist Tell If You Have Heart Problems?

Many people don’t think that their oral health could impact their heart health, but the two are actually very strongly connected. In fact, a study published in the American Heart Association Journal found that there’s a connection between gum disease and increased risk of heart attack, stroke, and other cardiovascular diseases. If you have any of these symptoms below, it might be time to schedule an appointment with your dentist in Boerne to discuss this further.

Signs of Gum Disease

First and foremost, it’s important to know and recognize the signs of gum disease so that if you suspect a problem you can see your dentist in Boerne as soon as possible. Gum disease can be treated effectively, but treatment is more successful when the disease is in the early stages. Some of the most common signs of gum disease include:

  • Gums that bleed while brushing or flossing
  • Bad breath that doesn’t go away
  • Puffy, painful gums
  • Bright red or purplish gums
  • Loose teeth
  • Gum recession
  • Changes in your bite or spaces between teeth

What Causes Gum Disease?

Most cases of gum disease are related to poor oral hygiene habits. Gum disease develops when plaque hardens on teeth, called tartar. Tartar is packed with bacteria that can cause more damage the longer the tartar sticks around. Additionally, tartar can’t be removed at home. Once plaque hardens into tartar, it must be removed through a professional dental cleaning.

What Does Gum Disease Have to Do With Heart Health?

Even though gum disease sounds like a mouth problem, it can actually affect the rest of the body, too. A study released last year from researchers at the Harvard School of Dental Medicine and the Forsyth Institute showed that active gum disease was an early risk factor in the patients studied who went on to have a heart attack. But why? Luckily, the researchers explained this as well and tied the increased risk of a cardiovascular event to inflammation. Gum inflammation can cause inflammation elsewhere in the body, such as the arteries, which increases the risk of a heart attack.

How to Prevent Gum Disease and Lower Risk of a Heart Attack

There are things you can do to reduce the risk of developing gum disease and, in turn, lower the risk of a heart attack. First, make sure to brush your teeth every day, twice a day, for two minutes each time. Also, don’t forget to floss at least once a day. Next, see your dentist in Boerne at least every six months for checkups and cleanings. These regular checkups allow your dental team to remove any plaque that has accumulated since your last visit and monitor your oral health for any changes. After all, early intervention often means a better outcome.

If it’s been longer than six months since your last dentist appointment, we welcome you to call and schedule an appointment today.